Author Archives: Ruth Ann Nordin

About Ruth Ann Nordin

Ruth Ann Nordin mainly writes historical western romances and Regencies. From time to time, she branches out to contemporaries romances and other genres (such as science fiction thrillers). For more information, please go to www.ruthannnordin.com or check out http://ruthannnordinauthorblog.wordpress.com.

Where to Publish (For New Writers Who Are Looking to Self-Publish)

Below is a video Janet Syas Nitsick and I did on publishing, specifically self-publishing.  The question came in, “What places can an author publish his book?” In this video, we answer this, but I’ll include the highlights below so you can read it instead if you wish.

There are two main options you have when you self-publish.  

1.  KDP Select (which means you can only publish through Amazon).

Amazon has a program called KDP Select which is exclusive.  It means you can’t publish anywhere else.  (You can, however, publish your paperback in several places.)  This exclusivity applies to the ebook.  And you must be exclusive with Amazon for three months.  After that, you can upload your book to other sites.

When you enter Amazon Select, your book will be automatically put into Kindle Unlimited (KU), which is a subscription service that allows people who pay for it to borrow KU books.  If someone reads 10% of the book, that counts as a borrow.  Each borrow doesn’t earn the same as a sale.  For example, if your book is $2.99, you will make 70% off that sale.  When your book is borrowed, you get a portion of whatever Amazon has decided to put into the pot for the month.  So if Amazon decided the pot is going to be $3 million, it will divide up that $3 million with all the borrows that were made on Amazon that month.

There are pros and cons to the Select approach.

Pros include: Amazon gives preference to these books.  For example, the book will come up more easily in searches.  Borrows count toward sales ranking, which can also help toward better exposure.  It is only three months, so you don’t have to be locked in for a long time.

Cons: While some books do well in Select, not all of them do.  It’s not a guaranteed ticket to instant sales/exposure.  In my opinion, this is not a good long-term plan.  The best strategy for a career as a self-published author is to be diversified.

You have to decide which is best for you.

2.  You publish on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iBooks, Smashwords, D2D, etc…

You can upload directly to Amazon (via KDP), Barnes & Noble (via Nook Press), Kobo (via Writing Life), and iBooks.  I believe you can publish directly to Scribd, too.

What I do is use Smashwords to publish my books onto the channels they offer.  I don’t use them for Amazon, but I do use them for Barnes & Noble, Kobo, iBooks, Baker & Taylor, Library Direct, Page Foundry, Overdrive, Flipkart, and Scribd.   Now, I have published some books directly to Barnes & Noble and Kobo.

You can also use D2D (Draft 2 Digital) to publish to various sites, but I haven’t used them and have no experience with them.  What I do know is that unlike Smashwords, you can’t sell on D2D.  Smash words will allow you to sell books (and yes, it’s not a whole lot you’ll sell there).  But D2D is pretty much a middleman to get your books from your computer to the other retailers.

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No matter what option you choose, something to keep in mind is that the average author is not going to have instant success.  I understand it’s easy to think there’s some magic formula you can use and make a living right away.  But the truth is, for most writers it will take hard work and persistence to pay off.  You will need to improve your storytelling ability while you’re also improving your promotional techniques.

The self-published author wears many hats.  You’re not only writing a book, but you also have to take care of the cover, format it for ebook and/or paperback, publish it, and then promote it.  If you need help with formatting or covers, here’s a link at Smashwords to help you find people who can help you with these things.

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Are there any questions you have or experiences you want to share with publishing?  The more input we have, the better we can all learn.  There might be something I missed. :)

Categories: Publishing Basics, Publishing Trends, Self-Publishing | 12 Comments

Independent Publishing and DMCA Abuse, or “How a Scammer Got My Book Blocked with Very Little Effort”

Ruth Ann Nordin:

UPDATE March 5, 2015:  I’m happy to say Amazon put Becca Mills’ book, Nolander, today!  This is a win for authors, and I’m glad Becca had the courage to share her experience so we can better know what to do if this ever happens to us.  (Hopefully, it won’t.)

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This is what was posted on March 3, 2015:

This is scary, folks. All self-published authors are vulnerable to this. The post is long, but it is a must read.

Anyone (for any reason) can decide to post a DCMA Takedown Notice on your book and get it removed from Amazon, Smashwords, etc. This author has registered her copyright with the US Copyright Office, but this has not been good enough, which is especially alarming because that should be our ultimate protection from stuff like this.

At the time I’m writing this (March 3, 2015), Smashwords has put her book back up. Amazon, however, has not. I’m going to keep track of what is happening.

This is something that should make us all sit up and take notice of what is going on. More importantly, we need to band together and support each other when stuff like this happens. I urge you to share this with other authors. The more people we tell, the better our chances are of protecting more authors (and even ourselves) from stuff like this happening.

My thoughts and prayers are with Becca during this horrible time.

Originally posted on The Active Voice:

Okay, I’ve got a story. It’s a sort of scary one. I think independent/self-publishing authors need to know about it, and telling it carefully and correctly is also important for my own situation, so I’m going to take my time and lay it all out in order.

Pressed for time? You can skip to the bottom for the TL;DR summation.


On Friday, February 27, 2015, I noticed that my bookmarked Amazon.com link to my first novel, Nolander, was yielding, “We’re sorry. The Web address you entered is not a functioning page on our site.” I went to my Amazon dashboard and discovered the book had been blocked.

In my spam folder, I discovered an email from Kindle Direct Publishing (KDP), Amazon’s self-publishing arm, informing me that someone had sent in a DMCA notice. In response, Amazon had summarily blocked Nolander from sale.

“DMCA” stands for “Digital Millennium Copyright Act.”…

View original 3,853 more words

Categories: Uncategorized | 16 Comments

Beta Readers

In the video below, Janet Syas Nitsick and I talk about beta readers.  I’m also writing down the main points below for your convenience.

A beta reader is a person who reads your book before it’s published.  A beta reader is a person who can look at the overall story and give you their impression of it.  But they are not an editor.  The editor is the one who goes in and polishes it up so it’s ready to be published.

So what makes a beta reader good?

1.  He makes deadlines.

You should have a schedule set out on when you’re doing your first draft, when a beta reader goes over your book, when you add their input, when you give it to an editor, and when you publish it.  When you treat your writing like a business, you will have deadlines that you need to make.  In order to better make those deadlines, you need to give the beta reader a deadline.  A good beta reader will have the book in by the deadline or let you know, in advance, if he can’t make it.

2.  He knows the subject matter.

For example, someone who is familiar with horses would make a good beta reader for your book where you use horses a lot.

3. He enjoys the genre you’re writing.

Ideally, the beta reader will be a fan of the subject you’re writing.  They need to read your book as your target audience would in order to best help you.

4.  He needs to be honest (but nice).

You need to be able to trust this person.  While it’s important the person tells you what’s good, they should also be comfortable with letting you know what you can do to improve the story.  But do pay attention to how they tell you the stuff they didn’t like.  Saying, “What happened?  Did your kid write this part for you?” is different from saying, “I would like to see more angst in your hero during this scene.”

How do you find this good beta reader?

1. When starting out, you pretty much have to go to people you know and trust.

These can be friends, family, or other writers.  The key is that you trust them to be honest about your work (as explained in #4 above).

2. Social Media

You want to broaden out your search and find readers in your genre who are avid readers.  They make for the best people to beta read books because they love to read and know what your target audience wants.

You can find these people on various social media outlets.  I prefer Facebook for social interaction, but there’s also Twitter, Google +, discussion boards, blogs, and other places I’m probably missing.  The key is to establish relationships.  Don’t go in with the attitude you’re going to get something from someone.  Be a participant.  Engage.  Be friendly.  Give something of value to the group.  Share and exchange ideas and information.  Talk about your favorite books and authors.  Be yourself.  Sooner or later, you’ll come across a couple people who will become your friend.

3.  Another way is to let readers come to you and offer to beta read.  

People who love your books are often more than happy to have a part in helping you get your book into the world.  These are the perfect beta readers because they share your vision for your work.  They already love it.  They are in tune with you and have the same goal you do.

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So those are the tips Janet and I came up with to finding good beta readers.  Anyone else have any tips they’d like to add?

Categories: General Writing, Writing as a Business | Tags: | 28 Comments

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