Author Archives: Ruth Ann Nordin

About Ruth Ann Nordin

Ruth Ann Nordin mainly writes historical western romances and Regencies. From time to time, she branches out to contemporaries romances and other genres (such as science fiction thrillers). For more information, please go to www.ruthannnordin.com or check out http://ruthannnordinauthorblog.wordpress.com.

Coping With Stress

There are many factors that can lead to stress in a writer’s life.  The problem is that there are some sources of stress you can’t control.  Examples of things you can’t control are what people think of your books, how well your promotional efforts will pay off, and what online retailers are going to do next.

stress article

ID 19168698 © Alain Lacroix | Dreamstime.com

So how can you cope?  After struggling with overwhelming stress for the past four months, I’ve come up with a few things we can do to help put stress at a manageable level.

1. Routine

I think the first thing to do is set up a routine.  Predictability helps to buffer you because constant change is a source of stress in itself.

Write in the same place.  Do all your non-writing activities in a different place.

I suggest writing in the same place(s).  This can be the same room in your home, or it can be outside the home.  Once I started writing at the Starbucks cafe in Barnes & Noble, my stress level went significantly down.  When I’m home, I don’t write.  Some people have offices in their homes where they do all their writing.  So working at home is fine.  Just make sure it’s in the same place each time you do it.

I do all my non-writing activities at home.  I edit at home.  I do emails at home.  I do blog posts at home.  But I no longer write there.  If you write in one room, then consider doing all your non-writing tasks in a different room.

By writing at the same place, you train your mind when it’s time to be creative.  By going to Barnes & Noble for 3-4 hours a day, I have bumped my word count from an average of 1500 – 2000 words a day to 3000 to 5000 words a day in a month’s time.  I’m able to write faster, and I feel fresher when I’m working.

Take days off.

I know the conventional wisdom is to write every single day, but this was killing me because I wasn’t giving my brain time to decompress.  I always worried I’d lose serious word count by taking days off.  But in April, I started writing Monday through Friday (sometimes only Monday through Thursday).   The other days were days where I was not allowed to do any work.  I could do anything else, but I couldn’t do anything with writing unless it was necessary, which was rare.

Getting back into things on Monday does take a little longer than it does on Tuesday, but I’ve found the days off have been the trick I needed in order stop feeling uptight all the time.

2.  Sleep

Sleep is important for mental and physical health.  I recommend giving yourself a bedtime routine at the same time each night (if you can) to help train your mind to get ready for sleep.  I like to spend one hour in bed watching a movie or TV show off my Kindle.  Some people like to read for pleasure.  Some people like to listen to music.  Whatever relaxes you is best, and it has to be non-work related.

How many hours of sleep you need depends on your body.  I need nine hours of sleep to feel truly refreshed in the morning.  I don’t always get it since I have four kids, but if I can get it on most nights, I’m good.  Some people can get by with less hours.  Try different hours until you find your ideal hours.

I know this is not possible for everyone, but try to get as much sleep as you possibly can.

3.  Diet

A few years ago, I was a skeptic that what we eat and drink can impact our ability to work better, but when I changed what I was eating and drinking and was twice as much productive during the day, I was convinced.

We all know the foods and drinks that are good for us, and we all know what we should avoid.  I’m not saying you can’t ever have the bad foods and drinks.  Just make them a treat for rare occasions instead of a part of your daily diet.

It might take you a couple weeks to adjust to the new diet.  You might even need to gradually change the way you’re doing things.  But if you make it a priority to eat and drink better, it will impact your ability to work better.

4.  Exercise

The choice of exercise is up to you, but I prefer walking.  You don’t have to do this every single day, but if you can do it a couple times a week, it’ll be better than doing nothing.

5.  Laugh

When you’re stressed, it’s hard to laugh, but that’s partly why I believe taking days off from writing and having a wind-down time before bed every night can help relax our minds so we’re more open to humor.

And with that being said, I thought I’d leave you with a cute little comic I found that made me chuckle.

comic for blog post

ID 19168698 © Alain Lacroix | Dreamstime.com

Categories: Uncategorized

Ideas for Making Marketing Fun

Janet Syas Nitsick and I did a video, which I’ll share below.  I’ll also write down the main points beneath the video.

Typically, marketing has boiled down to things like announcing you have a book out, saying you have a review on your book, or sharing your book’s ranking on a retailer site.  But is all that really effective when you’re trying to appeal to readers of your particular genre?  While there’s nothing wrong with informing people about these things, today we want to discuss ways of thinking outside the box when marketing.

The main question to ask yourself is this: what is going to appeal to your ideal reader?  

Think of the kind of things that interest your readers.  This isn’t included in the video, but last weekend I took an online course, and an author mentioned sharing extra tidbits with his readers about research he did that links up to his books.  One example of this would be writing about a child growing up in an orphanage.  In a newsletter, you can then share the history of a real orphanage based off research.

That aside, I’ll go to the contents of the video where Janet and I share ideas on ways to market.

Book Launch Page (or a page on your website/blog like it)

  1.  Make sure you link to every store where the reader can find your book.  One of the main reasons people don’t know you have a book on Kobo, Barnes & Noble, iBooks, and Smashwords is because authors are so busy focusing on Amazon that they neglect to share links to other retailers.  If you aren’t exclusive to Amazon, help yourself get traffic to other sites.
  2. On this page, you can also include a bonus video where you discuss something about the topic.  I find this especially useful if you’re doing nonfiction, but you could do a video to go with fiction, too.  For example, I have a book launch page for a book I did on writing.  If I were to do one for a fiction book where I featured a Mandan Indian in a historical western romance, I might include a video from when I went to Mandan, North Dakota and took a video of their tribe.  Even if you don’t use a video on a page like this, you can use pictures to give your potential readers something “extra” they won’t find in the book.
  3. You might want to also put endorsements on this page.  If you’re doing nonfiction and you can get someone with a well-known name who is an expert on your topic to endorse your book, it can go a long way.  Now, I mainly work with fiction, so for me, endorsements come from the characters in the book, and I find these can have entertainment value for the potential reader. (It’s especially good if you can add some humor to it, though not all books will lend themselves to humor.)   Here’s one Janet and I did together that we mentioned in the video.  If you write series where characters from one book can show up in another, you can use them in the endorsements, too.  I notice readers love revisiting old characters whenever possible, so this provided an extra treat.
  4. Having links to share this page can be useful, too, so potential readers can tweet it, pass it along on Facebook, etc.  The more word of mouth you can get, the better.
  5. Also, if you have a gift for making a fun and interesting bio, please do.  In nonfiction, you’ll want to point out what qualifies you to write the book.  In fiction, let your personality come out.

Blog Post Ideas

  1. Character resigns or they’re not happy with what you’re doing, and they’re not shy about voicing their opinion on the blog.  Let your characters have an attitude.  The angrier they are, the better.  The other day I was watching a video on You Tube about actors who hated their own movies, and I really enjoyed this “behind the scenes” look.  I like to think of these blog posts as DVD extras the reader can enjoy.  Since I promised an example of the blog post I did where I had a character resign, here’s the post if you want to check it out.
  2. Character plays the critic.  Have fun at your own expense.   You know those negative reviews you’ve gotten or the ugly email saying you suck and why?  Take this as fuel for your blog post.  Let one of your characters come onto your blog and voice the same complaints, but do a twist on it and make it funny.   I found as soon as I had the characters voice the same complaints my critics were saying, the complaints no longer bothered me.  So in a lot of ways, this technique is very therapeutic while making others laugh.  Honestly, I believe most people are drawn to others who aren’t afraid to admit they’re not perfect.  And this will make you seem more human to your reader.
  3. Audition for another author’s book.  (And get the author to respond if you can.)  Here’s an example of the one I did for Janet’s upcoming book.  This is all fun, of course, and I think it can help readers see us as real people when we take a chance by appearing in pictures or video as ourselves in some quirky or unusual way.  If there are bloopers, share them.  Bloopers are some of the funnest things to watch.  Here’s an example of the one where Janet and I were together (and yes, there really was a spider in the room.)  If you want to take it a step further, are your characters happy you spent time focusing on another author’s book?  Or might they feel betrayed?  What kind of video or blog post might that lead to?

Got ideas on making marketing fun that we didn’t think of?  Please share them below.  The more ideas we have, the better.

Categories: Book Promotion, Marketing & Promoting | Tags: , , , , , ,

Indie Author Fringe: a free online conference organized by The Alliance of Independent Authors (ALLi)

I’m sharing this information in case you’re interested.  I just found out there’s a free (yes, free) online conference.  The actual event is in London, but you can go from the comfort of your home by logging into your computer.

It goes from April 15-16, and it’s specifically for indie authors.

If interested, here are some links.

Here’s more information about the conference (includes a sign-up tab).  

Here’s the agenda (includes who is giving the presentations).  Some top names in indie publishing are going to be there.  They also include the times, and breakdown the time zone changes (which is very helpful).

If you’re inclined, they have ways you can spread the word about this conference.

Categories: Uncategorized

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