Got a Question? (Limited Time Sticky Post)

Most of the time, the questions we receive are covered in past blog posts.  In that case, we’ll link to the post in a reply.  But if you have a question that we haven’t covered, we’ll be more than happy to do a blog post on it if we know the answer.  If we don’t know the answer, we’ll just admit we don’t know it. :)

For a limited time, we’ll have this at the top of this blog for anyone who’d like to submit a question.  Given our busy schedules, it might take a while to answer the question, but we will make every effort to do so.

Categories: Uncategorized

When Should You Release a New Book?

Recently I wondered what the best time to release a new book was. Obviously you would want to release something scary prior to Halloween, something romantic right before Valentine’s Day, something full of snow and holiday cheer right before Christmas, etc. But what about the rest of the year? Are there days that are lucky for self-published authors? Is there a time of year that can help you get more copies into people’s hands? I was determined to find out.

Now despite my best efforts, I only have three books out at the moment (though I am working on getting more out soon), so I couldn’t rely on just my own experience ot answer this question. So when in doubt, I do what I normally do: ask the writing groups I belong to on Facebook. The answers I got were quite informative.

Of course there were the tips to release seasonal stuff around their seasons, but there was a ton more advice that I found quite interesting. One author’s observations was that people prefer introspective works in the summer (makes sense, seeing as I just read Go Set a Watchman) and mysteries and thrillers in the fall (that is when JK Rowling is releasing her next detective novel). Another author liked to follow the movie release schedule, releasing books whenever there’s a movie coming out in the same genre as his book. He also felt that people prefer laughter in winter months, “light and airy reads” in spring, adventure stories in the summer, and scary stuff in autumn.

Probably the most helpful advice I got from a woman who had recently read an article on the subject (which I wish I had a link for, but so far I have been unable to find the article). According to the article she read, the best time of year to run a promotion was the two weeks after Christmas. According to her, something about a free or discounted book after the holidays gets people buying, and that allowed her to retire from her day job and pick up writing full-time (which is something I’ll have to try).

Some other tips she gave included:

  • The best days of the month to release a book is between the 7th and the 14th.
  • If you’re self-publishing, don’t release your book on a Tuesday, because most big publishing houses release on Tuesday and you’d be in direct competition with them (wish I’d known that when I released my second novel). Instead, try to release on the weekend if you want good sales. Those days seem to be good days to publish for independent authors.
  • And if you’re trying to hit some bestseller list, release on Sunday or Monday. According to industry data, that’s a good time for self-published authors.

The one thing that all these authors seemed to agree on is that there was never a bad time to release a book. It was never directly stated in any of the comments I got, but it seemed to be implied. Sure, apparently Tuesdays might not be the wisest day of the week to release a book, but other than that there aren’t any days or times of the year when authors will doom themselves publishing a book.

And you know, I can’t help but see that as a good thing. Just means there are plenty of opportunities for authors to publish their books and maybe pull out a bestseller from them. And we all want that for our books, don’t we?

Does the advice here match your own experiences with publishing?

What advice do you have on the best time to publish a book?

Categories: Book Promotion, Business Plan, Digital & ePublishing, Marketing & Promoting, Psychology of Writing & Publishing, Publishing Trends, Schedules & Routines, Self-Publishing, Writing as a Business | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

So You Want to Publish a Book (Post 1): Is Your Book Ready to be Published?

Over the last two months, a couple people have asked me the same thing:  “I wrote a book.  Now what do I do?”  To answer each person separately would take a lot of time, and given that I was in the process of moving, I didn’t have time to sit down and write a series of blog posts to address this question.

Today, I’ll start the series.  That way when I get this question again, I can provide people with a series of links to help address the issue.  This is intended for people who have never published a book.

ID 37475863 © Iqoncept | Dreamstime.com

ID 37475863 © Iqoncept | Dreamstime.com

The first thing you need to consider is this: is your book ready to be published?

Self-publishing and even traditional publishing isn’t what it once was.  Regardless of the way you choose to  publish, you need to have a product that is worth publishing.  The bar has been raised on what you can publish.  With writers fine tuning their skills and taking editing seriously, you need to make sure your book is on par with theirs.

If you want to land a book deal with a publishing house, you will need a polished version to hand in to the acquisitions editor.  If you want to publish it yourself, the savvy self-published authors are seeking to have their books compete with the publishers, meaning they want their books to look like it came from a publishing house.  This is about putting a professional step forward.

So before you decide to publish, you need to consider two main things: editing and the storytelling craft.

So don’t skimp on the edits.

This doesn’t mean you spend years editing.  That’s too long.  But I would say a month or two of working through edits is minimum.  You don’t want to make the process so long you never get anything published, but you also don’t want to rush through it.  The best technique is to pace yourself.  I edit 1-2 chapters a day.  That way my mind is fresh when I get to it, and I don’t have time to get exhausted.  I also use a system of checks and balances where I have two to three others go over my book.  After taking in all the edits and making all the changes, I recommend a final read through.

I know in this instant gratification world we live in where things are usually given to us as soon as we want it, it’s easy to get impatient and want the book up today.  But taking the extra time to edit will be worth it.

Do you have a compelling story?

This is a harder one to pin down and explain since the definition of what makes for a compelling read varies from person to person.  But let’s just put it this way: are you so engrossed in your own book you get lost in it?  Or do you find yourself skimming?  If you’re skimming, chances are those parts are slowing your book down.  A compelling story is one in which you want to read everything.  It doesn’t have fillers that get glossed over.

The average reader will forgive an occasional typo, but they won’t forgive a story that bores them.

***

Until you have the two things above settled, you can’t move forward.  But for the sake of this blog, we’ll say you have a compelling and properly edited story.   That would bring me to my next post which I’ll put up next week.  In it, I’ll discuss whether finding a publisher or self-publishing is the best fit for you because there is no one-size-fits-all approach in this business.

 

Categories: Editing & Rewriting, General Writing | Tags: | 9 Comments

Authors and Bloggers: Still Time to Sign up for the Authors and Bloggers Against Piracy Blog Hop

authors and bloggers against piracy_zpsqem5dvt7This looks like it will be a fun way to spread awareness of book piracy and also a good way to get some exposure and introduce yourself to new readers. All genres are welcome!

Maegan Provan is organizing a blog hop to raise awareness of book piracy. To participate authors can donate prizes for the three prize baskets (these can be paper back books, book marks, ink pens, magnets, or even ebooks or coupons – anything you can think of!) and/or they can sign up to write post on their blog. Maegan will sort out the dates for posts (or you can always request a date) and provide a sample post you can use (talk about super easy!), though it would be even better if you added a little something to it to make it your own. Her suggestion is to share your first run-in with piracy and how it affected you. To post a blog you do NOT need to donate a prize, and vice versa. You can do one or both. It’s totally up to you!

If you’d like to sign up, please check out the Facebook group Authors and Bloggers Against Piracy. There you can find the sign ups for prize donations and for blog posts, as well as more information. The sign up deadline is August 31st, and prizes need to be delivered to Maegan by October 15th (For digital prizes she will message you the winner’s email).

The more authors and bloggers who sign up for blog posts, the more exposure we will each get as we bring our fans into the fun and give them a chance to win some amazingly cool prize baskets. (I’ve seen the sign up list so far, and each one is already guaranteed at least four signed books from different authors). If you have any questions you can ask them here, or in the Facebook Group.

Look forward to seeing you there!

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Categories: Marketing & Promoting | Tags: , | 6 Comments

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